The Lightning Project

The ongoing saga of the PNG Lightning Maroon Clownfish Breeding Project

Browsing Posts in Breeding

I skipped worrying about the hatch on the last spawn…we simply have too much going on in our lives at the moment to effectively start rearing a batch of clownfish this week.  Meanwhile, on 9/7/2014, the White Stripe Maroons, the unrelated F0 pairing, put down another nest, but small.  I’ve yet to see a really large nest out of these guys, and their spawning is not consistent yet.  I will try to raise this batch so I have outcross material…and down the line I may finally opt to split this pair up to make three foundation lines of Lightnings in my fishroom.

That’s all!

After a lot of downtime, the Lightning Maroon Clownfish F0 pair settled back in and put down a SMALL nest yesterday, in the afternoon of 8-30-2014.  This after a couple tile house collapses and such, combined with a diet change, which put them off for a few weeks.  Basically, I accidentally thawed the Shrimp/Scallop mix I had been making, and have yet to find the time to remake it, so the fish have been only on pellets (Thera A from Spectrum and Ocean Nutrition Formula 1).  Seems pretty apparent to me what happened here…

The tile house collapsed over the weekend, and upon restoring it, the Lightning Maroon and her mate promptly ate all the eggs, which suggests they were dead from lack of parental care / circulation (the tile wasn’t completely down, the eggs did not appear to be smashed).  That’s all for Spawn #38

I discovered spawn #38 around 10 PM on 7-28-2014.  Typical big orange spawn on the sloped ceiling tile.

Sadly, I should have done this the DAY it happened, because now I’ve totally forgotten.  But sometime last week (I think Wednesday or Thursday), the 2nd wild (F0) pair of PNG White Stripes that I have on hand put down a nest, and for the first time it’s “on the tile”.  I should also mention that the last spawn of the Lightning Maroons did indeed hatch while I was away speaking at the MBI Workshop; what’s interesting is that according to Mike, the hatch may have come a “day early” again.

Spawn #37 is laid

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It felt like this one took a long time to happen; spawn #37 was laid this afternoon by the Lightning Maroon Clownfish and her white stripe mate, 7-12-2014.

That is all…

The first second-generation Lightning Maroon Clownfish, progeny of a F1 Lightning Maroon mated to an unrelated, Wild (F0) PNG White Stripe, produced by Sea & Reef Aquaculture.

The first second-generation Lightning Maroon Clownfish, progeny of a F1 Lightning Maroon mated to an unrelated, Wild (F0) PNG White Stripe, produced by Sea & Reef Aquaculture.

I had to sit on this news since last month as this was an exclusive for CORAL Magazine; now that the magazine is out I can shout it out – Sea & Reef Aquaculture has succeeded in producing a second generation of Lightning Maroon Clownfish by using LM12 (an F1 from my pair here) with an unrelated wild (FO) PNG White Stripe Maroon. Highlights include the same 50/50 offspring split, as well as the interesting fact that Sea & Reef used the Lightning as a male vs. female.

As it’s a CORAL Magazine exclusive, I invite all Lightning Maroon Clownfish fans to head over to Reef2Rainforest.com and read the EXPANDED online version there.  I should note, I actually didn’t want to write the story (I prefer to have people tell their own stories) but in the end, the job fell to me. I hope you enjoy!

Spawn #36 missed

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Not really sure what happened on this one.  By all schedules, the evening of July 2nd, going in the morning of July 3rd, was the first “hatch night” for Spawn #36.  Somewhere shortly before midnight on the 2nd, we had a power outage.  It maybe lasted an hour, and when I got down into the basement, there was not a single egg on the tile, and not a single larvae swimming around in the tank. If I’m honest, it appears as though they may have hatched far earlier in the day, or perhaps were even eaten by the parents – normally there would have been SOME eggs left, but this time, nothing.  Did the fish freak out and eat the eggs during the power outage?  Frank, I don’t know. I don’t recall checking the nest at all today, so I really can’t say if it was even there in the AM.

And so ends spawn #36…

 

Spawn #27 came back to my fishroom on 6/20/2014, as Mike Doty has opted to do another run of Lightnings with spawn #36 (update on that as of 6-30, there were only about 10 that made it from Spawn #35 – Mike had some hatching issues this time ’round).

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I took the opportunity to do a headcount on Spawn #27 as I released the group into the BRT – provided I didn’t make any mistakes, the rough split was 28 Lightning Maroons, and 24 White Stripe Maroons.  Out of those 24 White Stripes, I maybe only noticed 3 that had extra markings and would fall into the “Morse Code” notion.

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I should point out that Mike and I discussed his rearing methodologies at great length; you’ll recall that part of the reason for allowing him to rear batches was to see if he could do any better, and my own effort to learn from him and work in collaboration. Say what you will, but the bottom line is that Mike reared spawn #27 with what amounts to a 50% water change weekly.  I can guarantee I was nowhere near that on some runs.  Of course, that’s not the only difference involved here…his methodology was to drain the standalone BRT half way each week, and gradually fill it back up over the course of the week, and then repeat.

It seemed like a very manageable system, and frankly it should be obvious that good base maintenance will get you good results.  There are still some deformed fish, but if I have to be honest, I think he reared a superior batch than the first big one. I’m going to look into segregating them out, as well as stepping up the water changes overall, as that can only help produce superior fish. It’s interesting to note that the sizes do vary immensely within the group, whereas the group of 10 I had going from around the same time is more homogeneous in size and has more patterning, and is comparable in size to these.  It will take a lot of really specialized research to hone in on some of the variables in play, but I look forward to doing that if I’m able.

Mike’s routine is hardly surprising – my breeding of Angelfish relied strongly on 50% weekly water changes, and based on published recommendations, while I took 3-4 months to hit market size doing 50% weekly water changes on growout, if I had stepped it up to 50% daily water changes, I would have cut my growout time down to 6 week!  Think about that.

Mike didn’t have a good hatch over the weekend on Spawn #35; I believe temperature issues were to blame.  Spawn #36 was laid on the afternoon of Thursday, June 26th, 2014.  If all goes according to plan that makes next Wednesday “hatch night”. Spawn #34 was a failure…I had run low on rotifers due to the success of Spawn #33, so by the time span #34 was down to a few fish, I just let it go.  I have yet to rear a single successful batch of Maroons in a standard 10 gallon aquarium – I know it can be done, but it hasn’t worked yet!  And yes, Spawn #33 is doing great, lots of good looking (but still very tiny) babies.

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