The Lightning Project

The ongoing saga of the PNG Lightning Maroon Clownfish Breeding Project

Browsing Posts tagged Stress Guard

I’ve offered 2 feedings since my last post.  One was ignored by both fish, and this last one, the Lightning Maroon ate again.  I’ve had mixing and heating for most of the day in anticipation of doing a water change this evening.  I did that water change.  Since I’m out of Seachem’s Stress Guard, I tried using another product in the same line of products, Kordon’s Fish Protector.  Fish Protector contains “colloids”, which is one of the main things in Stress Guard, as well as a “multi-layer” slime coat builder, also has B12 (not sure but I think this is the B vitiamin they use in Maracyn SW as an appetite stimulant), as well as Echinacea, which I’m not as “psyched” about but hey..gotta do something.  In thinking about some of the comment discussions about anemone’s as possible stimulants for slime coat production, I figured the unnatural, man made slime coat might be better than nothing.  Fish Protector is considerably thicker than Stress Guard.  I dosed 1 capful into the 5 gallon replacement water and let it mix quite thoroughly this evening before doing the water change.

I got a lot of uneaten food out of the tank, as well as a couple unseen big brown smelly stringy masses that I can only assume were the bodies of snails I had missed and thus killed with the Formalin.   After the water change, I dosed 5 drops of Formalin – admittedly this might not be “enough”, again owing to some of the comments about Formalin degredation.  I need to look into this more.  I DO intend a final Formalin DIP tomorrow, and I may do that in the AM.

I tested the salinity / SG and noted that it had gone up a touch to 1.011.  A bit of RODI water brought it back down to 1.010.  I noted no abnormally heavy breathing, and only one or two spots of ICH on the Maroons.  I already set up the next bucket of 1.010 water for whenever that next water change occurs.

Bottom line, I am very happy that the Lighting Maroon Clown is eating.  Eating is always a positive thing and is arguably critical for any sick fish…they need the nourishment even more so than your everyday healthy fish.  The female “acknowledged” food every so slightly today, but didn’t make any serious attempts to eat or even really investigate stuff.

Thank you to everyone who’s offered their supportive messages.  Keep sending those good vibes, I really, really appreciate them!  This is a very daunting task, and I hope is providing valuable experiences and reminders for everyone along the way!

So back on March 31st, in the midst of plenty of hard-core programming for work, I got a call from Fed Ex.  Mark Martin had arranged for a “hold at facility” on my shipment, which meant that Fed Ex called me when the boxes arrived.  It is better, and often quicker, than letting the fish bounce around on the truck, possibly exposed to the elements.  The only added hassel is that you have to go to Fed Ex to pick up the shipment.

The Fed Ex Facility

Pulling up to the Fed Ex Facility...

Customer Parking

Got a prime parking spot...

Walking into Fed Ex

Walked in the front door...

Picture of Blue Zoo Aquatics Shipping Boxes

...and left with 2 big boxes of fish from Blue Zoo Aquatics!

Got home, and opened up the boxes.  Here’s how it went down…

Open up the box...

Open up the box...

...Take off the lid...

...Take off the lid...

Blue Zoo Care Packages...

Set aside the Blue Zoo Care Packages for later use

...Peel back the newspaper....

...Peel back the newspaper....

...Open up the outer bag...

...Open up the outer bag...

...check out the size of this bag...

...check out the size of this bag...I wonder what is in here?...

...open up the smaller bag containing the large Female SEASMART collected PNG Maroon Clownfish...

...open up the smaller bag containing the large Female SEASMART collected PNG Maroon Clownfish...

...check the Salinity in the bag....

...check the Salinity in the bag....

...Add in some Stress Guard....

...Adding in Stress Guard per the Blue Zoo Instructions...

...time to open the BIG BAG....

...time to open the BIG BAG....

...and there it is. The SEASMART-collected Lightning Maroon Clownfish from Papua New Guinea (PNG)!

...and there it is. The SEASMART-collected Lightning Maroon Clownfish from Papua New Guinea (PNG)!

Another look at the Lightning Maroon Clownfish in the bag!

Another look at the Lightning Maroon Clownfish in the bag!

Up close on the Lightning Maroon Clownfish - check out this dorsal view!

Up close on the Lightning Maroon Clownfish - check out this dorsal view!

Check out the relative symetry of the markings on this PNG Lightning Maroon Clownfish, Premnas biaculeatus!

Check out the relative symetry of the markings on this PNG Lightning Maroon Clownfish, Premnas biaculeatus!

Stay tuned for the next installment of the recap…”Accliimation”!

All images are copyright 2010 Matt Pedersen.  No reuse without express written consent!

OK, so please see my earlier post for details on how I almost really botched things but in the end, caught a lucky break by thinking not to try something out on the Maroons first ;)

The large “regular” female Maroon went through a 45 minute Formalin Dip (20 drops, or 1 ml, of true Formalin (37% Solution of Formaldehyde) into 1 gallon of tank water, heavily aerated). When I took her out and placed her back in the tank, she looked like a NEW clownfish. Not a milky patch or spot on her. So I proceded with the Lightning Maroon, and it went through equally well, and seemed rejuvenated upon return to the tank.  I also happened to dose the tank with Seachem’s  Reef Plus, a general vitamin additive that I routinely dose to all my tanks.

You may recall that earlier tonight I was weighing the pros and cons of dosing their TANK with Formalin. Well…the PNG Saddleback and Allardis have already had 1 drop per gallon in their tank for 24 hours with no problems. Still…wasn’t convinced as it could kill off some of the life on their live rock (for the record, Mushroom Anemones tolerated, not loved, but tolerated hypo salinity at 1.010). Well, while sitting around keeping an eye on the Lightning Maroon Clownfish, I saw a dwarf blue leg hermit crab crawling around in the tank I’d already dosed with Formalin. “Hmm”, I thought. “I would’ve pegged the Hermit Crab to be dead in hours, if not minutes.”

And so, compensating for the large amount of live rock in their otherwise barren 20 Long, the Lightning Maroon’s tank was dosed tonight with 15 drops of Formalin, this in the hopes of preventing or at least keeping down re-infestation between dips.

I think I’ll sleep OK tonight, but I have to get up in 5 hours to pack up all the fish I sold that helped PAY for this project in the first place!!!  And I need to find Rod’s Food and Seachem’s Stress Guard (Blue Zoo includes a pipette in each care package, and I really read up on the stuff..it’s going to be good to use with the Formalin treatments, and I used up the last of it on the fish I “fried” earlier tonight).

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